In Honor of Dahlov Ipcar

Posted by on Feb 13, 2017 in Maine Artists Expressions of Coyote | Comments Off on In Honor of Dahlov Ipcar

 

Dahlov Ipcar
“Coyote Greeting”
Oil on Linen 22″ X 34″
2012

I feel that it is up to the artists of the present to reveal new ways of seeing the world
and to create new worlds never before seen.”    Dahlov Ipcar

Dahlov Ipcar, Beloved Maine artist, passed away on February 10, 2017 at 99 years of age. She was still painting on the morning of her death.  As a biologist I had the immense pleasure and honor of knowing her.

In 2012, I visited her in her studio in Georgetown, Maine. She was 95 years old at the time.  Her son Bob, encouraged me not to stay too long so as not to tire her. So after an hour I was going to leave, but she wanted me to stay and keep chatting. Such a gracious and warm woman.

The reason for my visit ~ I was going to cautiously ask her if she would like to participate in our I Am Coyote art exhibition in the Fall. Well….. the following is a quote from her describing where she went from there. (At the exhibition, each artist was asked to just make comment about their art piece…not to explain it…this was hers)

When I was first asked to paint something for the Coyote Art Show I was reluctant — not liking to work “to order” — and I put it out of my mind; but a few weeks later I awoke from a nap with the complete picture in my mind.  I made a small “thumbnail sketch” of my idea so I wouldn’t forget it. Then two days later Geri Vistein phoned me, and that clinched it. In some strange mystical way it seemed preordained, and so here it is as I dreamed it.”

And so you see above the art piece she created ….. honoring Coyote!

 

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“I Am Coyote” Inspires Art

Posted by on Nov 19, 2015 in Blog, Maine Artists Expressions of Coyote | Comments Off on “I Am Coyote” Inspires Art

Flight by Maine artist Evelyn Dunphy

Flight
   by Maine artist Evelyn Dunphy

When our Words inspire Art……

Renowned Maine artist, Evelyn Dunphy, after reading         I Am Coyote   was inspired to create this powerful watercolor. Her moving work depicts a dramatic event in this newly published book ~ the young dispersing female Coyote is fleeing across the mighty St. Lawrence River, via a bridge that she waited until dark to venture upon. She leaves the “city of man,” Montreal, behind her.

Note the intensity of her face in her will to survive.  The artist has captured the author’s words describing this most challenging experience of her journey.

“She needed to make a decision, and quickly. She made her final approach, and all was silent in the night. Without any question in her mind, she darted full speed across the bridge, her legs almost taking her airborne with a swiftness fueled by fear.”

 

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Coyote Connections

Posted by on Jan 25, 2015 in Blog, Maine Artists Expressions of Coyote | 0 comments

photo by Jacques Tournel

photo by Jacques Tournel

                                                                                                                                                                                                       How can you participate in creating the kind of world we want to hand down to our children?

In answer to that, I wish to share with you how community members in Maine together contributed their talents…. envisioning a different world than the one we live in.

Just below is a link to a short film created about our Coyote Connections art exhibition that took place from October, 2014 to January 2015 at the University of New England’s Gallery in Portland, Maine.

The exhibition happened because of the contributions of talented Maine artists, and this short film is the result of contributions from not only the Maine artists, but also a Maine composer, musicians, photographers who generously provided their photographs and asking no remuneration for their use, and from David who filmed it. Though it is not perfect, I think that what is beautiful about this short film is that the expressions within it are those of talented community members  who wished to contribute. That is where the CHANGE begins to happen in our society!

So here it is ~ 

https://www.youtube.com/embed/BuEkHhDknEU?rel=o

 

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Coyote and the New Paradigm

Posted by on Nov 17, 2014 in Blog, Maine Artists Expressions of Coyote | 0 comments

Split Rock by Richard Letham

Split Rock by Richard Letham

This poignant work of art by renowned Maine artist Richard Letham can be viewed along with 49 other extraordinary works of art at the University of New England’s Gallery in Portland, Maine. The exhibition titled “Coyote Connections” will be up for our communities to experience until January 15, 2015.

We asked each artist to write a reflection regarding their art piece, and the following is his:

“In pondering your challenge ((he speaks of “challenge” as our invitation to participate in this special exhibit), it was first necessary to read the book you recommended on Coyote behavior for background information(that book is The Voice of the Coyote by Frank Dobie).  Then a thorough immersion into Coyote Reader by William Bright to absorb the legendary myths passed down mostly from the Native American point of view.

That provoked me to re-read “Black Elk Speaks” and “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee” which rekindled my outrage at our history of genocide and loss of the Indian environmental wisdom.

The resulting large painting called “Split Rock” refers to one of those Native American legends which predicts the emergence of a new world paradigm of peace and appreciation for life on earth when the rock splits.”

And so this artist set Coyote in the context of that “split rock” ……Coyote comes before us and speaks…..”How will you continue to treat me….for how you treat me predicts the measure of the emergence of the new world paradigm.”

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Open Season

Posted by on Nov 8, 2014 in Blog, Maine Artists Expressions of Coyote | 0 comments

"Open Season" by Sandra Crowell

“Open Season” by Sandra Crowell

Artists from all over Maine are participating in the University of New England Gallery exhibition ~ Coyote Connections”  October 9, 2014 to January 15, 2015 in Portland, Maine.

This powerful piece, created by artist Sandra Crowell, depicts numerous Coyote pelts displayed after their slaughter. But in front of the pelts stands a beautiful Coyote staring out at you…..maybe she is asking “Why?”

Each artist was asked to write a short reflection on their art piece. And this is Sandra’s~

“Bait and shoot, leg or neck hold trap and shoot, chase them down with dogs and shoot, all year long, night or day, no bag limit! Come, quench your blood lust, and pose for photos that make you look like a real hunter.”

Here she reflects what many, many Maine people have shared with me ….that those who slaughter Coyotes relentlessly have nothing to do with real Maine hunting….they dishonor the tradition!

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Maine Artists’ Expressions of Coyote

Posted by on Oct 13, 2014 in Blog, Maine Artists Expressions of Coyote | 0 comments

"The Ghosts of Evergreen Cemetery by Mark McCullough

“The Ghosts of Evergreen Cemetery by Mark McCullough

Coyote Comes to Portland, Maine!

In a wonderful collaborative effort, the University of New England Gallery in Portland, Maine, 31 artist from all over the state and myself offer to our communities……“Coyote Connections.”  This very special exhibit will be up for our communities to experience from October 9, 2014 until January 15, 2015

This unique art exhibition is all about Coyote’s connections, or you could say, relationships here in Maine (and all over our American continent). Our very talented Maine artists express these relationships through their thoughtful, powerful, and beautiful works.

Here is just one example ~ a large oil painting by Mark McCullough. Each artist was asked to write a short reflection of their work. And here is his ~

“Resilient and clever, eastern coyotes thrive in downtown Portland and other eastern cities.  Last winter I tracked a family group in the snow in Evergreen Cemetery adjacent to the University of New England campus.  Like ghosts, their tracks weaved through the Victorian tombstones. Coyote will be here long after we are gone.”

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